Question: An Example Of Irony In Mending Wall Is When The Speaker Of The Poem?

Perhaps the greatest irony in the poem “Mending Wall ” is that the speaker continues to help rebuild the wall even as he realizes he disagrees with its presence. As the poem progresses, the speaker notes how all sorts of natural forces, like the ground and animals, conspire to take down the wall each winter.

Is it ironic that the speaker initiates the mending?

The speaker grows apples while their neighbor only has pines in their yard. Neither of them have grazing animals. With this aversion to barriers, it is ironic that the speaker is the one who initiates the mending of the wall.

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Is the Speaker of the Mending Wall?

As the enotes guide (linked below) discusses, it can be said that the author of the poem, Robert Frost, is the speaker because they have many similarities, but more likely Frost and the speaker are two separate entities as Frost seems to be poking fun at or criticizing the speaker for being unable to see problems in

What is the speaker in Mending Wall doing?

In “Mending Wall”, the speaker attempts to persuade his neighbor to rethink the purpose and construction of his wall/fence.

How does the Speaker of the Mending Wall feel about the neighbor in the poem?

The speaker rejects this blind, unthinking adherence to senseless tradition. He sees his neighbor as one who “moves in darkness” that is “[n]ot of woods only and the shade of trees.” He believes his neighbor moves in the darkness of ignorance. His neighbor is like “an old-stone savage.”

How is the wall ironic in the Mending Wall?

Perhaps the greatest irony in the poem “Mending Wall ” is that the speaker continues to help rebuild the wall even as he realizes he disagrees with its presence. As the poem progresses, the speaker notes how all sorts of natural forces, like the ground and animals, conspire to take down the wall each winter.

What is ironic about the speaker’s statements concerning his neighbor’s opinion of wall building in Mending Wall?

One irony of this poem, then, is that the speaker does not like fences or walls and, yet, he participates in the upkeep of the wall between his property and his neighbor’s; we would expect him to refuse to do this work. The speaker actually feels that walls are unnatural.

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Why does the speaker say elves in mending wall?

The neighbor would ask in a literal way, what is that something, and the speaker pictures himself saying it is “elves,” which is a figurative way of describing the force that works against the wall. He likes the idea of something as fanciful as elves working to roll the stones away from the wall.

What does Hughes mean when he sings American?

Literally, to sing about America. But the speaker is also alluding to Walt Whitman’s poem “I Hear America Singing.” In that poem, “singing” is a metaphor for participating in the construction of American life.

Why does the speaker say something there is that doesn’t love a wall?

What is the reason for the poet to say ‘something there is that doesn’t love a wall’ in Robert Frost’s poem Mending Walll? The speaker of the poem says so because he has experienced that ‘something’ is there that causes the cold ground under the wall to swell and burst.

What is the difference between the speaker’s view of the wall and his neighbors view of it?

What is different about the way the speaker and the neighbor view the wall? The speaker views the wall as a way to “mend” the friendship between he and his neighbor, but the neighbor sees it as something that should be used to keep them apart.

Which wall does the speaker mean?

Which wall does the speaker mean? ➜ The speaker means the prison’s wall.

Does the speaker in Mending Wall think fences make good neighbors his neighbor does but does he?

His neighbor will not be swayed. The speaker envisions his neighbor as a holdover from a justifiably outmoded era, a living example of a dark-age mentality. But the neighbor simply repeats the adage: Good fences make good neighbors.

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Why and how Frost and his Neighbour mending the wall?

Answer: The poet and his neighbour mend the gaps in the wall by walking along the wall on either side and picking up the fallen stones and placing them back on the wall in an effort to mend it. The poet’s apple trees will never go to his area to eat the cones of his pines.

Which phrase best describes how the speaker feels about the wall in Mending Wall?

Robert Frost Mending Wall: How does the poem’s speaker feel about the walls? The speaker sees no reason for the wall to be kept—there are no cows to be contained, just apple and pine trees. He does not believe in walls for the sake of walls.

Why does the neighbor say that good fences make good Neighbours in Mending Wall?

Why does the neighbor say that “good fences make good neighbours” in “Mending Wall”? He doesn’t want cows in his fields. He is repeating what his father used to say. He is worried about people being on his land.

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